Premier League title ‘hardest ever to predict’

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Online sports betting firm NetBet believes this season’s title winners could be the hardest to predict in Premier League history.

Six teams have odds of 9/1 or shorter.

However, compared with last season, the odds on Manchester United and Chelsea winning the league are marginally longer.

Despite the high-profile arrivals of Antonio Conte at Stamford Bridge and Jose Mourinho at Old Trafford, both Premier League heavyweights have seen their odds to win the title drift from this time last year.

Chelsea are out from 6/4 to 11/2, the same odds as United who were 5/1 last August.

The major reason for these lengthening odds is the incredible emergence of Champions Leicester City, famously 5000/1 outsiders at the start of the last campaign.

The Foxes are now just 30/1 to repeat that feat. Tottenham are the other big movers, their impressive displays and third place finish last season seeing the Londoner’s title odds shorten from 100/1 to a present 9/1.

Liverpool and Jurgen Klopp are also priced up at 9/1 and widely tipped to challenge.

NetBet Premier League title odds compariisonNetBet’s infographic shows the starting prices for individual teams to win the league last season along with their eventual finish (Chelsea were 10th) as well as starting prices for the 2016/17 season.

‘The bookies aren’t always right’

NetBet spokesman Alexandre Mangaud said: “A lot of our customers are extremely loyal to their own teams and not only bet on them winning the league but also bet weekly on results, last season it was fans of West Ham who cashed in.

“Fans who bet £10 to win on each of the London club’s games last season would have seen them with a £344 profit for the season even though their team only finished seventh in the League.

“Apart from Leicester’s giant-killing performance, the Premier League also saw some other big upsets when Bournemouth beat Chelsea (9/1), Newcastle beat Spurs (9/1) and in the biggest upset of the season, West Ham beat Arsenal (13/1) – we bookies don’t always get it right.”

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